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Search results for “text image context”


Art of Documentation: Documents and Visual Culture in Medieval England

Jessica Berenbeim

Art of Documentation: Documents and Visual Culture in Medieval England Studies and Texts

Studies and Texts 194; Text Image Context: Studies in Medieval Manuscript Illumination 2. xviii, 242 pp. 147 colour and b&w images • 2015 • 8x10 in. • ISBN 978-0-88844-194-2 • Cloth • $95

The later Middle Ages was a time of profound connection between the spheres of bureaucracy and art. By discussing the two together, this book argues that art-historical methods offer an important contribution to diplomatics, and that works of art are important sources for the cultural reception of documentary practices. Documents are also an important model for representation, and an understanding of the paradigmatic role of the document suggests alternative dimensions to the interpretation of late-medieval art.

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Art in a Time of War: The Master of Morgan 453 and Manuscript Illumination in Paris during the English Occupation (1419–1435)

Gregory T. Clark

Art in a Time of War: The Master of Morgan 453 and Manuscript Illumination in Paris during the English Occupation (1419–1435) Studies and Texts

Studies and Texts 197; Text Image Context: Studies in Medieval Manuscript Illumination 3. xxviii, 388 pp., including 253 colour images. 2016. ISBN 978-0-88844-197-3 • Cloth • $125

Art in a Time of War seeks to fill an important gap in our knowledge of painting in fifteenth-century France. Focusing on the work of “the Master of Morgan 453,” an accomplished, if unnamed, manuscript illuminator, Clark identifies, compares, and analyzes all extant books that can be attributed to the painter and reconstructs his career on the basis of a wide range of liturgical as well as art-historical criteria.

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Body-Worlds: Opicinus de Canistris and the Medieval Cartographic Imagination

Karl Whittington

Body-Worlds: Opicinus de Canistris and the Medieval Cartographic Imagination Studies and Texts

Studies and Texts 186; Text Image Context: Studies in Medieval Manuscript Illumination 1. 2014. xii, 212 pp.

New in Paperback (2016): ISBN 978-0-88844-426-4 • $45.00
Casebound: ISBN 978-0-88844-186-7 • $85.00

The Italian priest Opicinus de Canistris fell ill in 1334 and had a divine vision that inspired drawings of continents and oceans transformed into human figures; these beautifully strange drawings relate to contemporary maps and seacharts, religious iconography, medical illustration, and cosmological diagrams.

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Optics, Ethics, and Art in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries: Looking into Peter of Limoges's Moral Treatise on the Eye

Edited by
Herbert L. Kessler and Richard G. Newhauser

Optics, Ethics, and Art in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries: Looking into Peter of Limoges's Moral Treatise on the Eye Studies and Texts

with the assistance of Arthur J. Russell

Studies and Texts 209; Text Image Context: Studies in Medieval Manuscript Illumination 5. 2018. xiv + 212 pp. ISBN 978-0-88844-209-3 • Cloth • $95

This volume examines afresh the various ways in which the introduction of ancient and Arabic optical theories transformed thirteenth-century thinking about vision, how scientific learning came to be reconciled with theological speculation, and what effect the results of these new developments had on those who learned about them through preaching.

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Painting the Page in the Age of Print: Central European Manuscript Illumination of the Fifteenth Century

Edited by
Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Robert Suckale, and Gude Suckale-Redlefsen

Painting the Page in the Age of Print: Central European Manuscript Illumination of the Fifteenth Century Studies and Texts

Studies and Texts 208; Text Image Context: Studies in Medieval Manuscript Illumination 4 • 2018 • xxxiv + 330 pp. • ISBN 978-0-88844-208-6 • Cloth • $110

The history of the book in the late Middle Ages is associated especially with Gutenberg’s momentous invention of printing with movable type. Printing, however, hardly replaced the manuscript book overnight; in respect to content, materials, format, decoration, dissemination, and technique, the fifteenth century in German-speaking lands witnessed an extraordinary range of innovation and experimentation. Nonetheless, over a century of scholarship has tended to dismiss the illuminated manuscripts produced in central Europe between 1400 and the Reformation, the vast majority of them unknown beyond a small group of specialists, as mediocre manifestations of a culture in decline. This book – originally published in German to accompany a series of exhibitions in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland from 2015 to 2017 – was written to challenge these prejudices and the weight of tradition they represent.

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